Tag Archives: National Journal Dinner

Potential of Innovative Payment Models Examined at Thought Leader Dinner

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The U.S. healthcare system can easily be described as one of the most complex in the world, with intertwining relationships between payers, providers and patients. While the medical community has made significant strides in developing breakthrough medicines, there is more work to do to ensure patients can access and pay for them. Stakeholders in both the private and public healthcare sectors are moving away from fee for service payment toward more value based care.

Many believe innovative payment models that tie the cost of medications to value could support more cost-effective healthcare and give patients access to groundbreaking treatments. This requires collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and both private and public payers to reach agreements that could help address concerns about the cost of medicines while supporting continued biopharmaceutical innovation.

20151208_NJ_AstraZeneca_Dinner_104Thought leaders from across the healthcare industry recently gathered in Washington D.C. to share perspectives on this topic at a dinner event hosted by AstraZeneca in partnership with the National Journal, and moderated by Marilyn Werber Serafini, Vice President for Policy at the Alliance for Health Reform. AstraZeneca U.S. leadership team members were joined by 16 thought leaders and members of the media, representing organizations such as the American Medical Association, National Association of Medicaid Directors, American Association of Retired Persons, Cystic Fibrosis Association, the National Pharmaceutical Council and others.

Questions posed to the group throughout the evening included: What potential do innovative payment models hold for new medicines and other treatments? Which models currently being tested have the potential to become more widespread? What barriers are preventing widespread adoption of these models? What role should government play in this discussion?

20151208_NJ_AstraZeneca_Dinner_097Dave Fredrickson, Vice President of Specialty Care at AstraZeneca commenced the discussion by noting the challenges that currently exist within the U.S. healthcare system and highlighting AstraZeneca’s belief that innovative payment models that include pharmaceuticals play an important role in the continued evolution of the healthcare system from fee for service to value based approaches. Initial discussion circled around the definition of value and consensus quickly formed around value needing to be focused on the patient.

The discussion at times raised more questions than answers, as challenges around widespread implementation of innovative payment models appeared complex and multi-faceted. Potential solutions that surfaced included leveraging data and real world evidence to define and measure key metrics and implementing processes that foster competition within the industry while continuing to reward innovation. It was noted that though there may never be one single 20151208_NJ_AstraZeneca_Dinner_179payment model that can be applied across the healthcare industry, disease-specific models may continue to emerge that have the most impact due to the varying needs of patients.

Diane Sullivan, Vice President of Market Access and Patient Strategies at AstraZeneca, summarized the evening, observing that despite the differences of opinion, everyone in healthcare is on this journey together and will need to work collaboratively to see which methods will result in the best outcomes for patients. Only time will tell which model(s) currently being tested will be most successful, as no dominant model has yet emerged that can address the far-reaching issues at hand.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

Confronting Type 2 Diabetes, a National Epidemic

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The statistics are staggering: healthcare experts say that diabetes – the chronic disease that affects more than 29 million Americans today – has reached epidemic proportions. The cost of diabetes in 2012 in the United States was $245 billion in healthcare expenses, and authorities predict that if historic trends continue, there could be as many as one-in-three people living with diabetes by 2050.

While new treatment approaches have become available over the last decade, more work can be done to improve the quality of care and outcomes for people with diabetes. How can the health system best manage the country’s growing diabetes epidemic? What should healthcare providers do to better educate their patients about the disease? And how can the health system work together to better coordinate their treatment?

These were the main discussion topics at a thought leader dinner during American Diabetes Month, hosted by AstraZeneca in partnership with the National Journal, and moderated by Steve Clemons, Washington Editor-at-Large, National Journal and The Atlantic.

20151116_NJ_AstraZeneca_Dinner_016Topher Brooke, Vice President, U.S. Diabetes, AstraZeneca, who was joined by Lori Tierney, Vice President, Commercial Operations, AstraZeneca, kicked off the discussion by emphasizing the unmet patient needs in managing type 2 diabetes, and focusing on early action in the treatment paradigm.

As a company committed to advancing the national dialogue around diabetes, members of AstraZeneca’s North America leadership team were joined by 14 thought leaders and members of the media from leading organizations like the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, America’s Health Insurance Plans, the American Enterprise Institute, the Washington Business Journal and others.

The candid discussion focused on a variety of topics, including education, prevention and pre-diabetes, and lack of attention as a public health topic – highlighting the enormity and multi-faceted nature of this chronic disease. Attendees focused part of the importance of healthcare providers in the equation. With the growing number of people who have or will develop type 2 diabetes, it is more important now than ever before to have the appropriate number of endocrinologists, primary care doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and diabetes educators to meet the needs of patients.

20151116_NJ_AstraZeneca_Dinner_173The dinner guests aligned on the need for greater education for healthcare providers and patients, and to create urgency around diabetes – stressing a potential “lightening rod” idea that could spark behavior change when it comes to lifestyle modifications and hopefully preventing people from developing diabetes.

Several of the guests highlighted the importance of taking local community-based initiatives that are having impact for people living with diabetes, and launching those in other parts of the country, to ultimately scale up those pilot programs to service a greater number of communities.

At the conclusion of the evening, there was a common agreement that despite the large task at hand to manage the growing diabetes epidemic, there is much that can be done when we combine efforts across key parties including health care providers, patients, public and private organizations, and the health system as a whole to achieve better health outcomes.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

Delivering on our Commitment to Military Veterans

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Veterans Day, nationally observed every year on November 11, is a celebration to honor America’s veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good. Through recent milestones, AstraZeneca has continued to pursue our goal of maintaining a workplace that attracts military veterans, addresses their unique needs and leverages their skills and experience to strengthen the company as a whole.

2016_MFE_Logo_200x200The 2016 Military Friendly® Employer designation recognizes employers who have invested considerable time, money, and personnel to build military recruiting and retention programs, as well as policies to accommodate Guard and Reservists who continue to serve our country. AstraZeneca is honored to be included in the 2016 list of the Military Friendly® Employers. We earned a place on this prestigious list by recognizing the competitive edge that transitioning military give to our workforce. The talent, skill, and experience veterans bring to the workforce is priceless.

AstraZeneca’s commitment to those who serve was also demonstrated with Paul Hudson, President, AstraZeneca US, recently signing the Employee Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Statement of Support. The intent of the program is to increase employer support by encouraging employers to act as advocates for employee participation in the military. Since its inception, hundreds of thousands of employers have signed Statements of Support, pledging their support to Guard and Reserve employees. Paul Hudson and Topher Brooke, Vice President, US Diabetes, and Executive Sponsor of the AstraZeneca Military Support Employee Resource Group, met with Gary Stockbridge, ESGR State Chair, to add AstraZeneca to the list of companies who commit to supporting military employees.

AstraZeneca recently participated in an event with the National Journal, during which a panel of veterans discussed the needs regarding veterans returning to the workforce following the end of their service. As an employer, AstraZeneca recognizes the value that veterans bring to a company and the importance of actively recruiting and retaining military veterans. Our Military Careers site is catered specifically to this population, where those interested can search for AstraZeneca jobs, read employee testimonials and learn more about our commitment to veterans.

Veterans offer valuable skills and experience that employers should actively seek to grow the strength and diversity of their workforce. We strive to continue to implement ways to make AstraZeneca a place that veterans and military employees see their full potential through fulfilling career opportunities and support resources.

Pictured above, Paul Hudson (right) signs the ESGR Statement of Support, with Topher Brook (left) and Gary Stockbridge (center).

Veterans Transitioning Back to Civilian Life: Opportunities for Transformation in the Workforce

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Almost 7% of the roughly 319 million Americans in the United States (U.S.) are veterans, according to the Census Bureau. Figures published by the New England Industry Liaison Group suggest that the military has over 7,000 jobs across more than 100 functional areas, but approximately 19% of these military jobs do not have a direct civilian equivalent. In many cases, additional certifications are needed for veterans to obtain equivalent jobs after leaving the service.

It is important to attract, hire and retain qualified diverse employees – to remain competitive for prospective employees, and to ensure diversity of thought, skill, background and experience are embraced in a way that will address the needs of the evolving population. What military service skills can veterans carry over to a civilian workplace and how should companies harness these proficiencies? What challenges do veterans face upon return to the U.S.? Participants of a recent thought leader reception, underwritten by AstraZeneca in partnership with the National Journal and moderated by Steve Clemons, Washington Editor-at-Large, National Journal & The Atlantic, engaged in a lively discussion spanning these questions and others.

20151008_NJ_On_The_Homefront_153Paul Hudson, President, AstraZeneca U.S. and Executive Vice President, North America kicked off the discussion by urging representatives from veterans’ advocacy organizations, employers, Hill staffers, Congressional committees, think tanks and media to drive transformation so that all veterans transition back to jobs where they can contribute their training and diversity of perspective to a meaningful purpose.

The panel of speakers was made up by Eric Eversole, Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce and President, Hiring Our Heroes; Lieutenant Colonel Brian Gilman, Director, National Organizations, Chairman’s Office of Reintegration, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Department of Defense; The Honorable Martha McSally (R-AZ), Member, House Armed Services Committee; and Matt Miller, Chief Policy Officer, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. The panel highlighted the need for stronger collaboration, opportunities for mentorship, increased understanding of the evolving needs of veterans and better transitional programs.

Recent figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggest that almost 49.5% of the 21.2 million veterans in 2014 are neither employed nor seeking employment. In addition, veterans commit suicide at a higher rate than non-veterans. To help veterans better transition to civilian life, attendees noted a need for more best-practice sharing across organizations and at the community level. Not only is it critical that we provide jobs for veterans that best leverage their unique voices, views and talents, but we must also work to provide support to their families and spouses.

For example, a report from the Institute for Veterans and Military Families found that the unemployment rates of 25 to 44 year-old Armed Forces female spouses were almost three times higher than their civilian counterparts. Attendees stressed a need for helping young service members and their families build networks and find mentors. At AstraZeneca, for example, we have a Military Support employee resource group where employees can connect with our wide network of military members and their families across the globe. Additionally, we are involved in a number of other initiatives to support and make a difference in the lives of our military men and women.

20151008_NJ_On_The_Homefront_093AstraZeneca also supports a program at HonorHealth, a hospital system based in Phoenix, Arizona that aims to hire and deploy Transition Support Services (TSS) specialists – former combat medics – to provide personal assistance to Medicare beneficiaries recently discharged from the hospital for congestive heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and pneumonia. As one of the only programs of its kind, these TSSs engage with patients upon admission to the hospital, at the time of discharge and for at least 30 days post-discharge, focusing on using medical and wellness education and relationship-building tools to assist patients in not only managing symptoms, but helping them live happier, healthier lives.

As we look ahead to the Veterans’ Day holiday on Wednesday, November 11, we are reminded of the opportunities to help employers and all Americans better understand veterans and their value in the community as civic assets. AstraZeneca is committed to continuing the dialogue and ensuring that the many voices, views and talents of military veterans can be meaningfully used to address the unique needs of the U.S. population – including the critical needs of the patients we serve every day.

The reception was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

Women in Leadership: Progress and Obstacles

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Over the past 50 years, women’s labor force participation has increased by 53%, according to the United States Department of Labor. In that time, important legislation, such as the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 and the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 were passed, advancing women’s equality in the workplace. With each of these milestones, and others noted on this infographic, women continue to have more opportunities to pursue careers they find meaningful and fulfilling.

Despite these advances, challenges still exist as women pursue leadership roles. What can be done to close the gap and increase the number of female leaders in the U.S.? How do women successfully advance in their careers, and where is more support needed? These questions and others were raised during a recent thought leader dinner, hosted by AstraZeneca in partnership with the National Journal, and moderated by Emily Lenzner, Vice President of Global Communications, Atlantic Media.

thoughtdinner__ashleygainesphotoThe event brought together national thought leaders from Fortune 500 companies and non-profit organizations, former members of government, entrepreneurs, and members of the media in Washington, D.C. to discuss perspectives on advancing women in leadership. Bahija Jallal, Executive Vice President, AstraZeneca and head of MedImmune, hosted the event and led a lively conversation among the 20 female leaders in attendance.

The discussion encompassed a variety of topics, including the importance of women seeing other women in leadership roles so they could more easily envision themselves reaching higher positions. The topic of work-life balance naturally arose, and participants noted the conversation should be reframed to focus on work-life integration and the need to embrace flexibility. According to a Pew Research Center survey on women and leadership, children are not the leading reason women opt out of more significant roles. Only about one in five say women’s family responsibilities are a major reason there aren’t more females in top leadership positions.

thoughtdinner_gloriasinclairmillerAs one participant noted, men think about how they can fill professional roles even if they do not meet all of the qualifications. Conversely, women are more likely to doubt their skills if they do not meet all the requirements. In 2014, Forbes reported that “men are confident about their ability at 60%, but women don’t feel confident until they’ve checked off each item on the list.”

Leaders discussed strategies and opportunities for gaining confidence in the workplace. One area of focus was the idea of moving outside your comfort zone. Women should become more comfortable with taking risks and accepting assignments that may not be “the path well traveled”, but demonstrate leadership skills. The ability to ask for feedback, and the willingness to fail after taking a chance were cited as tools for women to use in the workplace. Participants also pressed the importance of women collaborating and networking with each other to create a support system.

thoughtdinner_bahijajallalphoto2The evening concluded with points about how thought diversity will take companies further, and the ways in which women can begin to open up those thought channels by accepting opportunities and remaining resilient despite setbacks that may occur.

As one attendee noted, quoting what United States House Representative Member Geraldine Ferraro said describing her friend and fellow politician Congresswoman Bella Abzug upon her passing: let women not knock politely on the door, but take it off its hinges.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

AZ Brings Together Thought Leaders to Discuss 21st Century Cures Initiative

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Last week AstraZeneca, in partnership with the National Journal, brought together thought leaders from key patient groups, payers, advocacy stakeholders and media for a thought leadership dinner in Washington, DC. Greg Keenan, Vice President, Medical Affairs and U.S. Head Medical Officer, AstraZeneca, Steve Mohr, Deputy General Counsel, North America and U.S. General Counsel, AstraZeneca and Rich Buckley, Vice President, North America Corporate Affairs, AstraZeneca participated in the first of five events to be hosted this year with the National Journal, with a specific focus on the 21st Century Cures initiative, which AstraZeneca proudly supports.

Earlier this year, the House Energy and Commerce (E&C) Committee released the first draft of its highly anticipated 21st Century Cures initiative. The proposed legislation – and its focus on accelerating the discovery, development, and delivery of new medical treatments and technologies – combined with the report released by the Senate HELP Committee’s “Innovation for Healthier Americans” and President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, have reignited the debate about biomedical innovation and regulation in Washington.

Furthest along in this debate is the E&C Committee’s draft legislation, which has raised important questions about how drug manufacturers can expedite the development of effective, personalized treatments, while ensuring their safety and value for patients. What is the proper role of government in this process? And will legislation on these topics reach the President’s desk by the end of the year?

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As a company committed to listening and learning from all sides of the discussion, members of AstraZeneca’s North America leadership team were joined by 17 thought leaders and members of the media, representing companies such as Quintiles, Avalere, National Pharmaceutical Council, Aetna, AARP, National Center for Health Research and Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. Marilyn Werber Serafini, Vice President for Policy at the Alliance for Health Reform moderated the evening’s discussion, which brought forward four key themes attendees felt were fundamental to address in the House’s legislation:

  1. Importance of enhancing health care professional (HCP) engagement/participation in clinical trials
  1. Integrating patient-centered approaches into clinical trial design
  1. Continued funding of NIH and FDA through PDUFA, and holding the FDA accountable to measurable outputs
  1. Ensure a clear path for innovation that protects patient safety within the drug discovery, development and approval process

NJ_AstraZeneca_Dinner_051The candid discussion elevated a diversity of perspectives around the scope of the proposed legislation. One participant expressed concerns with patient safety coming at a sacrifice to innovation, which should not just mean “new” medicines, but those that meet a true unmet need and are both better and safer for patients.

As an alternative perspective, several attendees saw a clear effort being made by industry to deliver innovative medicines, but recognized there was a need to accelerate and modernize the FDA’s processes in order to bring those treatments to patients sooner.

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One guest in particular emphasized the importance of incentivizing physicians to participate in clinical research by removing barriers for this to happen and working within their hospitals and institutions to gain alignment on what this incentive framework looks like.

Despite differences of opinion and a diversity of voices at the table, there was alignment around a fundamental need for a healthy and innovative clinical research landscape that keeps HCPs, patients and patient safety at its core.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

Thought Leaders Focus on Diversity in Final National Journal Dinner

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Many questions revolve around the topic of workplace diversity, such as how it can be quantified by employers, and what exactly a diverse talent pool looks like. How can we tell if companies are truly doing enough to drive a diverse culture? This far reaching subject was recently examined at a dynamic event where AstraZeneca leaders hosted a conversation with experts on diversity in Washington, D.C.

Laura_4This thought leader dinner was the final event of a series of four C-suite-level engagements taking place over the course of this year in partnership with the National Journal, a nationally recognized non-partisan publication. Laura Mably, Vice President, US Human Resources and Rich Buckley, Vice President, North America Corporate Affairs, led a group of experts and executives – including non-profit leaders, academia and other key stakeholders – in a discussion around diversity in the workplace: how companies can promote diversity and the challenges they face in this effort.

Rich_1Participants agreed that there is no silver bullet when it comes to achieving a diverse workforce. The definition of diversity itself was debated and while there was agreement in actions and measures that organizations can take to recruit, retain and develop diverse talent, there was also consensus that as a country, we have a long way to go.

Many interesting themes arose during a lively discussion around the role of leadership in achieving a diverse workforce. This proved to be a controversial topic and spurred many sides of a debate, one side arguing that management and senior leaders must be the ones to begin a diversity and inclusion strategy from the top down – modeling the right behaviors, engaging with their direct reports and creating the platforms for the future. Whereas opposing viewpoints stressed the importance of building a diverse and inclusive culture from the bottom up, allowing an organic culture to grow and finding actions and measures which will outlast any one particular leader.

Dinner_1The discussion touched on the pipeline gap in North America and how difficult succession planning can be for diverse talent. This opened a wider discussion about cultivating diversity out into our world beyond the workplace. All participants were in agreement that until we achieve diversity in our personal lives – in schools, churches, playgrounds – we can’t achieve diversity where we work.

At the end of the evening, however, there was a shared energy and optimism around the table about how companies and leaders can hold each other accountable for making true culture change in the years to come.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

Personalized Medicine takes Spotlight at Thought Leader Event

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Personalized medicine can take on many different meanings based on one’s perspective and experience, which made for lively debate as the topic took center stage at AstraZeneca’s latest thought leadership dinner held in Washington, D.C. in partnership with the National Journal. On Monday, October 20, AstraZeneca executives brought together industry leaders and stakeholders to discuss the current state and future of personalized medicine.

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Rich Buckley, Vice President, North America Corporate Affairs and Dave Fredrickson, Vice President, Specialty Care, mingle with guests.

The event was the third of a series this year, the first focusing on patient centricity and the second on value in healthcare. Dave Fredrickson, Vice President, Specialty Care; Will Mongan, Vice President, Business Development, New Product Planning and Foundations Portfolio; and Rich Buckley, Vice President, North America Corporate Affairs led a group of 14 industry experts and executives – including patient advocates, providers, academia, media and other key stakeholders – in a discussion about the concept of personalized medicine

Participants agreed that the paradigm of treatment and delivery for care in today’s healthcare system is rapidly shifting, and patients are at the heart of this transformation. Many attendees also agreed that regulations need to keep pace with innovation, and that some level of collaboration will be necessary across the system in order for doctors, academia, payers, providers, regulators and drug companies to produce meaningful outcomes. This is complicated by the fact that the roles of these key stakeholders are changing, making it more difficult to reach a consensus about what matters to patients and what the guideposts for development should be.

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(Left to right) Sheila Walcoff, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Goldbug Strategies, LLC; Marilyn Werber Serafini, Vice President, Policy, Alliance for Health Reform; Will Mongan, Vice President, Business Development, AstraZeneca; J. Russell Teagarden, Senior Vice President, Medical and Scientific Affairs, National Organization for Rare Disorders

Patients are becoming increasingly involved in their own care and diagnosis, along with their doctors. This allows greater potential for doctors to personalize patient care and to observe patients in real-time to improve outcomes and adherence. Attendees said that in order to determine the most appropriate treatment for patients, providers need to be able to analyze in rapid form. The current regulatory system contains administrative and procedural hurdles that call for more evidence and increased scientific validity. In order to keep up with the current transformation, we need to reexamine the burden of proof with respect to evidence, as well as approaches to clinical practice and innovation to ensure that treatments can become more patient-centric.

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(Left to right) Paul Sheives, Director, Diagnostics and Personalized Medicine Policy, Biotechnology Industry Organization; Robert Wright, Chief Editor, Life Science Leader Magazine; Sheila Walcoff, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Goldbug Strategies, LLC

While seeking a common definition for personalized medicine, some participants talked about it as a goal, others as an art or a tool; some defined it as precision medicine, and others thought the definition was unimportant. All participants agreed that the system must shift in terms of regulation, though some called for a fundamental redesign, while others asked simply for incremental changes. One participant added that no matter what we call it, we are all united in our collective goal to provide cures to patients in a world of transformation.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

Industry Experts Join AZ Leaders to Discuss Value in Healthcare

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How is value defined by healthcare’s many stakeholders? How can the priorities of these stakeholders be pursued to get the best result for patients? How can the U.S. healthcare system improve patient health, while lowering the cost of care?

Paul Spittle, Vice President of Growth and Marketing, AstraZeneca

Paul Spittle, Vice President of Growth and Marketing, AstraZeneca

These questions and others were explored on Monday, July 14, as AstraZeneca executives – including Paul Spittle, Vice President of Growth and Marketing; Diane Sullivan, Vice President of Market Access & Patient Strategies; and Rich Buckley, Vice President of North America Corporate Affairs – hosted a group of industry experts in Washington, D.C. for a dinner discussion about the concept of value in today’s evolving healthcare environment.

Participants represented a broad range of stakeholders, from insurance and hospital executives, to nonprofit groups, policy experts and media. Julie Rovner, Robin Toner Distinguished Fellow and Senior Correspondent for Kaiser Health News, served as moderator for the discussion.

Rich Buckley, Vice President of North America Corporate Affairs and Diane Sullivan, Vice President of Market Access & Patient Strategies, AstraZeneca

Rich Buckley, Vice President of North America Corporate Affairs and Diane Sullivan, Vice President of Market Access & Patient Strategies, AstraZeneca

Participants discussed how the definitions and perceptions of value are wide-ranging and constantly evolving (over time and through changing circumstances), making it difficult to identify effective and sustainable solutions to improve healthcare.  Despite these challenges, the group explored a number of actions that can be taken to help strengthen and preserve the quality of healthcare for patients while controlling costs — from better harnessing the power of available data and technology, to offering wellness and preventable care programs, to engaging patients in the health value discussion in a truly meaningful way.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area to discuss possible solutions to the country’s biggest challenges.

AZ Leaders Host Patient Centricity Dinner Discussion

AstraZeneca’s Paul Hudson and Greg Keenan mingle with dinner guests.

AstraZeneca’s Paul Hudson and Greg Keenan mingle with dinner guests.

At AstraZeneca, patients are why we come to work every day.  We always seek to understand and reflect their needs.  And we pay close attention to the wider healthcare environment and continuously look for opportunities to collaborate, exchange ideas and learn from others across the industry who share a common goal of improving patient health.

On Monday, April 21 in Washington, D.C., AstraZeneca leaders – including Paul Hudson, President, AstraZeneca U.S. and Executive Vice President, North America; Greg Keenan, Vice President of Medical Affairs and U.S. Head Medical Officer; and Rich Buckley, Vice President of North America Corporate Affairs – were joined by 20 leading experts and executives to explore the topic of patient centricity in an evolving healthcare environment.

The participants, who represented a broad range of stakeholders including businesses, nonprofit groups and media, shared their knowledge and perspectives on the state of patient care and how a patient centric approach can help drive quality healthcare.  Maggie Fox, senior writer on health issues for both NBCNews.com and TODAY.com, served as moderator for the discussion.

“As the healthcare landscape continues to change, the role of the patient in making healthcare decisions is transforming as well,” said Hudson.  “As the industry seeks ways to adapt, it is imperative that we work together to understand patients’ challenges and priorities so we can identify and deliver solutions that improve their experiences and outcomes.”

AstraZeneca’s Paul Hudson leads a dinner discussion with attendees about various patient centricity topics.

AstraZeneca’s Paul Hudson leads a dinner discussion with attendees about various patient centricity topics.

Topics addressed included the future of patient-centered care, the most impactful way the industry can be engaging patients moving forward, and where various stakeholders can be playing a larger role.  Participants agreed that aligning incentives in the healthcare system – so that providers are rewarded for quality of healthcare and great results – is important to ensure care is truly patient-centered.   Innovative ideas for getting patients more engaged in their care were also discussed, along with the need to truly understand first what matters to patients and then build treatment plans from there.

The dinner was part of a series of events coordinated by National Journal LIVE, a premier events business that convenes top leaders in the Washington, D.C. area for dialogue on how to solve the country’s biggest challenges.